Medicaid Planning Facts You Didn’t Know About

Althaus Law Family Estate Planning

Do Trusts Have Disadvantages? YES!

With the recent changes in estate planning and probate laws in Colorado, Medicaid planning is not as easy as it once was and will-based plans are becoming more and more popular over trust-based plans. I have taken the time here to list some of the benefits of a will-based plan, and some of the potential downfalls to a trust-based plan (especially when Medicaid is concerned):

  1. Medicaid laws change very frequently making it impossible to guarantee that a plan written today will work tomorrow. This is true even if you pay much more money for a trust-based plan over a will-based plan.
  2. In order to best protect against Medicaid claw backs you need to make an irrevocable trust, preferably where you are not the trustee. This means that you do not own or control your property anymore. That relationship makes Medicaid supposedly not being able to come after it. If, however, you break the formalities of the trust and show “incidents of ownership” Medicaid will still claw through these trusts.
  3. If you own property as Joint Tenants With Rights of Survivorship then as soon as one person passes, the Joint Property passes immediately to the surviving spouse. It avoids probate and arguably there is nothing for Medicaid to make a claim against. This would not apply if you were the second spouse to pass, however. This type of planning can be completed without a trust at all.
  4. The Medicaid laws allow for exempt or non-countable assets. This means that the government doesn’t count your primary residence, your car, some of your personal household goods, retirement accounts, and more in their claw back review.
  5. Probate is actually recommended by many attorneys now in Colorado due to the numerous law changes. You get the benefit of a creditor cutoff period where creditors have only four months to make claims or they are forever barred. A lot of debt gets wiped out this way and the cutoff period is not available for trusts. Further, a judge signs off on the work an executor/personal representative completes, releasing them of liability in the future. A judge does not sign off on anything for a trust in most cases.

I have done both trust administrations and probate cases. Both have taken similar amounts of time, and I have seen trust administrations actually cost more in the end. There are instances when a trust can be very beneficial. Tax avoidance and probate avoidance are two of those. I only recommend avoiding probate if you have property in other states, however.